Independence Day

Introduction

On July 4, 1776, Independence Day (also known as the 4th of July) was officially declared in the United States. As a result of the Continental Congress’s declaration, the thirteen American colonies were now no longer under the control (and subordination) of King George III of Great Britain. Still, they were now united, free, and independent states. Congress voted to declare independence on July 2, but it was officially declared on July 4.

Aside from fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, and political speeches, Independence Day usually calls for a wide range of public and private events celebrating America’s history, government, and traditions. U.S. Independence Day is the nation’s national holiday.

An increasing sense of anger

The United States was a member of the Kingdom of Great Britain before the Declaration of Independence. North America was settled by people from Great Britain in the 1600s. The British founded 13 colonies between 1607 and 1732: Virginia, New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Delaware, North Carolina, South Carolina, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Georgia.

People in these colonies thought the British government mistreated them as they grew. Tea, for example, and the right to have British soldiers stay in their homes were taxed. These laws had to be followed by the colonists, and they could not change them. That led to rebellion. In 1775, the Revolutionary War erupted between colonists and Great Britain.

However, fighting was insufficient. To explain their reasons and gain support from other countries, such as France, the colonists decided to declare their independence in writing. A small group of colonial representatives gathered on July 4, 1776, to adopt the Declaration of Independence.

Independence Declaration

All 13 colonies signed the document, which a committee led by Thomas Jefferson drafted. However, the British government refused to accept it. After fighting for independence for nearly 15 years, the colonists finally conquered Great Britain in 1783.

Currently held at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., the Declaration of Independence symbolizes self-government and human rights recognized worldwide. According to the second sentence, all people are created equal and enjoy privileges such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

The US and UK are good friends today. Parades and fireworks are everyday celebrations of Independence Day in the United States. According to historians, this was due to the letter written by John Adams, who helped draft the declaration and went on to become the second president of the United States. Adams predicted in his letter to Abigail that future generations would celebrate the colonists’ independence with parades and bonfires.

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